Welcome to the Green Touch Hub community network, the first multimedia platform created for the hands-on individuals, craftsmen and industry innovators who grow, beautify and maintain the greenscape of our amazing planet!

img
By: Admin    September 28 2017 , 04:47 pm
Avg. Rating:
Category: Local , Nature , Garden , Horticulture


Botanical gardens are essential for saving endangered plants, according to a recent study published in Nature Plants journal: the BBC reported on this study in a recent article. According to the BBC: “The world's botanic gardens contain about a third of all known plants and help protect 40% of endangered species” and went on to say that “Scientists say that with one in five of the world's plants on the brink of extinction, botanic collections hold the key to saving rare plant life.” So, what exactly are botanic gardens, and where are they found?


The history of botanical gardens can be traced all the way back to the “physic” garden found in Europe in the 1500’s and 1600’s. Physic gardens were a way to have medicinal plants on hand for their healing properties as well as to study them. The physic garden gradually developed into the modern day botanic garden that we see in urban areas.


Botanic gardens remain essential for scientists to study and protect plants both “in situ” and “ex situ” - meaning in, as well as outside, their natural habitat.


Perhaps the most well-known botanical garden is none other than the United States Botanic Garden in Washington, D.C. The United States Botanic Garden was created in the early 1800’s as a way to “collect, grow and distribute plants of this and other countries that might contribute to the welfare of the American people” according to the United States Botanic Garden website. The United States Botanic Garden opened to the public in 1850, and has been located at its’ current location on Independence Avenue in D.C. since 1933.


Botanical gardens abound throughout the United States. A quick search on the Botanic Gardens Conservation International website’s Garden Search page can help you find the closest one to you.

A few beloved botanic gardens include the following:

  • New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, New York.This 250-acre garden was founded in 1891 and is now listed as a National Historic Landmark. Its world class team of scientists categorizes approximately 50 new species of plants every year. The New York Botanical Garden is a hub for scientific progress and partners with international communities to explore and discover the latest in botany. There are numerous individual gardens within the entire Botanical Garden, including a children’s garden, a cherry garden, a crabapple garden, and flowers such as water lilies, daffodils, lilacs, roses, and orchids. The New York Botanical Garden is a perfect place for everyone in the family.


  • Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus, Ohio was the first conservatory in the United States to host a seasonal butterfly exhibit. Franklin Park also is home to some incredible art. The gardens host a large collection of glass pieces by the famous artist, Chihuly; as well as a 7,000 count LED light display created by the famous light artist James Turrell, that lights up the John F. Wolfe Palm House on the property every night. The Palm House itself is a beautiful Victorian era glass greenhouse that has 43 species of palm inside its walls.

Besides being an integral part in our world’s conservation efforts, as well as a great way for scientists to study plants up close, botanic gardens fulfill a societal need for beauty.

Botanical gardens are wonderful for relaxing in nature and appreciating the simple beauties all around – like that of a flower or a butterfly. With children’s gardens, world class artwork, and classes for adults, botanic gardens remain not only an essential part of conservation, but an enriching experience for all.  

Rate this news :
Kristen Pesta Sep 28,2017

Beautiful! I want to visit them all!

Todd Turner Sep 28,2017

The New York Botanical Garden is one of my absolute favorites.

Elizabeth Dietz Oct 02,2017

I am fascinated with the idea of being able to keep rare plants from extinction. Good article!

Comment